Anglicanism Poetic Spirit A Celtic Service Reflection

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Anglicanism Poetic Spirit A Celtic Service Reflection
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“The Poetic Spirit of Anglicanism” A Reflection for the Celtic Service. One of the things that we hear most often said about the Celtic Candlelight Service at St. Thomas’ is that it is meditative

“The Poetic Spirit of Anglicanism” A Reflection for the Celtic Service By The Rev. Marek P. Zabriskie Rector of St. Thomas’ Episcopal Church Fort Washington, Pennsylvania Friday, May 30, 2008 One of the things that we hear most often said about the Celtic Candlelight Service at St. Thomas’ is that it is meditative, and the words to the liturgy are almost poetic. Anglicans love their words. When we changed from the 1928 Book of Common Prayer to the new Prayer Book in 1979, many Episcopalians, grieved the loss of the old, familiar and beautiful words of the 1928 Prayer Book. We shape our words, and then our words shape us. We love their rhythm and their rhyme. When the Episcopal Church moved from Morning Prayer to the service of Holy Eucharist as the chief service for Sunday mornings, many Episcopalian lamented that we no longer sang the canticles anymore. We missed singing the poetic words of the Venite: Come, let us bown down, and bend the knee, And kneel before the Lord our Maker. For he is our God, And we are the people of his pasture and the sheep of his hand. Oh, that today you would hearken to his voice! Mention the names of Thomas Cranmer, John Jewell, Richard Hooker or Lancelot Andrewes to a non Anglican and you are likely to draw a blank stare. Our theologians are rarely recognized by those outside our denomination.



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